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Reid's Farm Part 2

A popular subject for early railway artists?

The Liverpool & Manchester Railway (L&MR) opened in 1830 and Reid's Farm was an early stopping-place, first appearing in fare schedules in 1831. The first part of this post looked at how Reid's Farm got and lost its name, subsequently becoming known as Barton Moss (which I take to be a subset of Chat Moss in the context of . . .

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October 18, 2017

Dale Street Redux

A large repository of C19th Liverpool sketches

British Museum FTW

It's always fun to find a new source, not least when it's a book written 200 years ago that triggers the search. Americal pioneer chemist and science educator Benjamin Silliman visited London in 1805 and was impressed by what he found at the British Museum (BM) if not by the rushed nature of the visit.

. . .

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February 22, 2017

The Chinese carriage

What was it for?

I know almost nothing of the Chinese carriage, not even its proper name. I'm calling it Chinese carriage because it has the words Chinese and Liverpool painted on the side we can see. Did it say Chinese and Manchester on the other side? Of course, many carriages had names and the epithet may have had no meaning beyond being aspirational. . . .

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February 11, 2017

The life and times of Isaac Shaw

Pioneer railway artist of the L&MR

The two railway artists

Two artists feature most prominently in the early history of the Liverpool & Manchester Railway (L&MR). Thomas Talbot Bury was an architecture student who recorded the early days of the L&MR and then went onto a well-documented career as an architect.

By comparison what we know of Isaac . . .

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February 07, 2017

Mona's Isle

An early railway advert at Crown Street station

Hidden gems

The artist and scene painter Isaac Shaw left us a portfolio of interesting prints of the early Liverpool & Manchester Railway (L&MR), including one of Crown Street station which can be seen in its full glory on the Facebook page of the Liverpool & Manchester Railway Trust. I will return to talk about the . . .

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February 06, 2017

Newton

Trying to make sense of a mysterious painting

View of Manchester and Liverpool Railroad taken at Newton 1825: a mystery wrapped in an enigma

Charles Calvert's painting of trains passing at Newton-le-Willows (or Newton-in-Makerfield as it was more likely known at the time) has been widely reproduced despite obvious defects in perspective with regard to the train on the right. . . .

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February 05, 2017

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